SHINDC Menu for Rosh Ha-Shana

Contributed by Afraim Katzir (for Jewish Food Experience)

 

Photo from Reyna Simnegar’s Persian Food from the Non-Persian Bride.

 

On both nights of Rosh Hashanah, we eat a number of foods before the main meal to symbolize our hopes for an auspicious New Year.  The sage Abaye of Babylonia, born around the close of the third century, states in the Talmud tractate of Keritut (6a): “Now that you have said that an omen is significant, at the beginning of each year, each person should accustom him/herself to eat gourds, fenugreek, leeks, beets and dates..."  Accordingly, it is customary to have a seder (traditional order of foods before the actual meal) where we eat these symbolic foods and others, which represent good omens for the New Year. 

 

Many of these foods were specifically chosen because their Hebrew/Aramaic names are related to other Hebrew/Aramaic words through puns that convey wishes for a prosperous and secure New Year. The menu that I propose for the actual meal of Rosh Hashanah is inspired by these symbolic foods, which for Sephardic Jews include: תמרים "tamarim" (dates); סלקא "salqa" (beets or swiss chard); כרתי "karti" (leeks or cabbage); קרא "qara" (gourds); רוביא/לוביא "lubyeh/rubyeh" (black-eyed peas); רימון "rimon" (pomegranates); something sweet "matoq" (מתק), like candied quinces "habushim" (חבושים) or apples dipped in sugar/honey; and the head "rosh" (ראש) of something, like a lamb "keves" (כבש) the tongue counts:

 

Menu

Karti Salad: Cabbage Salad with Fresh Herbs    Rimon / Salqa Soup: Pomegranate & Beet Soup   |   Lubyeh Entrée: Veal Stew with Black-Eyed Peas     Meren / Rosh Sides: Rice with Carrots & Orange   *   Beef Tongue Tagine with Swiss Chard OR   *   Persian Rosh Hashana Tongue with Tomatoes & Mushrooms   |   Tamarim / Matoq / Qara Desserts: Dates Stuffed with Walnuts Served w/ Vanilla Ice-cream   *   Candied Quinces Served w/ Vanilla Ice-cream OR   *   Candied Pumpkin Served w/ Vanilla Ice-cream OR   *   Candied Spaghetti Squash Served w/ Vanilla Ice-cream        

Carciofi alla Giudia (Jewish-Style Artichokes)

Contributed by Afraim Katzir

 

http://jewishfoodexperience.com/recipes/carciofi-alla-giudia-jewish-style-artichokes/

 

It seems that any dish that has the word Jewish in its name is fried. “Jewish fish” is actually fried fish, which, when introduced to Britain by late seventeenth-century Sephardic refugees, evolved into fish and chips. A Jewish-style artichoke (right in the photo), which is a family favorite, adopted from Sephardic Roman-Jewish cuisine via my Moroccan granny is a fried and seasoned artichoke that tastes like potato chips. In my family, we usually eat this during Passover, when artichoke season begins, and if we can find them out of season during Hannukah when it is customary to eat fried foods. Photo by Moshe Zusman Photography Studio.

Moroccan-Style Stuffed Artichoke Bottoms

It seems that any dish that has the word Jewish in its name is fried. “Jewish fish” is actually fried fish, which, when introduced to Britain by late seventeenth-century Sephardic refugees, evolved into fish and chips. A Jewish-style artichoke (right in the photo above), which is a family favorite, adopted from Sephardic Roman-Jewish cuisine via my Moroccan granny is a fried and seasoned artichoke that tastes like potato chips. In my family, we usually eat this during Hanukkah, when it is customary to eat fried foods, as well as during Passover. - See more at: http://jewishfoodexperience.com/recipes/carciofi-alla-giudia-jewish-style-artichokes/#sthash.RATAZXSQ.dpufIt seems that any dish that has the word Jewish in its name is fried. “Jewish fish” is actually fried fish, which, when introduced to Britain by late seventeenth-century Sephardic refugees, evolved into fish and chips. A Jewish-style artichoke (right in the photo above), which is a family favorite, adopted from Sephardic Roman-Jewish cuisine via my Moroccan granny is a fried and seasoned artichoke that tastes like potato chips. In my family, we usually eat this during Hanukkah, when it is customary to eat fried foods, as well as during Passover. - See more at: http://jewishfoodexperience.com/recipes/carciofi-alla-giudia-jewish-style-artichokes/#sthash.RATAZXSQ.dpufIt seems that any dish that has the word Jewish in its name is fried. “Jewish fish” is actually fried fish, which, when introduced to Britain by late seventeenth-century Sephardic refugees, evolved into fish and chips. A Jewish-style artichoke (right in the photo above), which is a family favorite, adopted from Sephardic Roman-Jewish cuisine via my Moroccan granny is a fried and seasoned artichoke that tastes like potato chips. In my family, we usually eat this during Hanukkah, when it is customary to eat fried foods, as well as during Passover. - See more at: http://jewishfoodexperience.com/recipes/carciofi-alla-giudia-jewish-style-artichokes/#sthash.RATAZXSQ.dpufIt seems that any dish that has the word Jewish in its name is fried. “Jewish fish” is actually fried fish, which, when introduced to Britain by late seventeenth-century Sephardic refugees, evolved into fish and chips. A Jewish-style artichoke (right in the photo above), which is a family favorite, adopted from Sephardic Roman-Jewish cuisine via my Moroccan granny is a fried and seasoned artichoke that tastes like potato chips. In my family, we usually eat this during Hanukkah, when it is customary to eat fried foods, as well as during Passover. - See more at: http://jewishfoodexperience.com/recipes/carciofi-alla-giudia-jewish-style-artichokes/#sthash.RATAZXSQ.dpuf

Contributed by Afraim Katzir

Stuffed artichoke bottoms (left in the photo above), prepared by the Moroccan side of my family, always made Shabbat and holiday meals (especially Passover) special while growing up. Coincidentally, Moshe Zusman, who photographed this dish, shared that his own Moroccan mother makes them and that this dish is one of his favorites as well. The artichoke bottoms are usually stuffed with meatballs. However, I inherited my nutritionist grandmother’s passion for making vegetarian/vegan variations of our treasured family dishes. The natural choice was an eggplant “meatball” studded with chunks of mushroom and bell pepper. Photo by Moshe Zusman Photography Studio. - See more at: http://jewishfoodexperience.com/recipes/moroccan-style-stuffed-artichoke-bottoms/#sthash.piV4mXPY.dpuf

 

http://jewishfoodexperience.com/recipes/moroccan-style-stuffed-artichoke-bottoms/

 

Stuffed artichoke bottoms (left in the photo), prepared by the Moroccan side of my family, always made Shabbat and holiday meals (especially Passover) special while growing up. Coincidentally, Moshe Zusman, who photographed this dish, shared that his own Moroccan mother makes them and that this dish is one of his favorites as well. The artichoke bottoms are usually stuffed with meatballs. However, I inherited my nutritionist grandmother’s passion for making vegetarian/vegan variations of our treasured family dishes. The natural choice was an eggplant “meatball” studded with chunks of mushroom and bell pepper. Photo by Moshe Zusman Photography Studio.

Stuffed artichoke bottoms (left in the photo above), prepared by the Moroccan side of my family, always made Shabbat and holiday meals (especially Passover) special while growing up. Coincidentally, Moshe Zusman, who photographed this dish, shared that his own Moroccan mother makes them and that this dish is one of his favorites as well. The artichoke bottoms are usually stuffed with meatballs. However, I inherited my nutritionist grandmother’s passion for making vegetarian/vegan variations of our treasured family dishes. The natural choice was an eggplant “meatball” studded with chunks of mushroom and bell pepper. Photo by Moshe Zusman Photography Studio. - See more at: http://jewishfoodexperience.com/recipes/moroccan-style-stuffed-artichoke-bottoms/#sthash.piV4mXPY.dpufStuffed artichoke bottoms (left in the photo above), prepared by the Moroccan side of my family, always made Shabbat and holiday meals (especially Passover) special while growing up. Coincidentally, Moshe Zusman, who photographed this dish, shared that his own Moroccan mother makes them and that this dish is one of his favorites as well. The artichoke bottoms are usually stuffed with meatballs. However, I inherited my nutritionist grandmother’s passion for making vegetarian/vegan variations of our treasured family dishes. The natural choice was an eggplant “meatball” studded with chunks of mushroom and bell pepper. Photo by Moshe Zusman Photography Studio. - See more at: http://jewishfoodexperience.com/recipes/moroccan-style-stuffed-artichoke-bottoms/#sthash.piV4mXPY.dpuf
Stuffed artichoke bottoms (left in the photo above), prepared by the Moroccan side of my family, always made Shabbat and holiday meals (especially Passover) special while growing up. Coincidentally, Moshe Zusman, who photographed this dish, shared that his own Moroccan mother makes them and that this dish is one of his favorites as well. The artichoke bottoms are usually stuffed with meatballs. However, I inherited my nutritionist grandmother’s passion for making vegetarian/vegan variations of our treasured family dishes. The natural choice was an eggplant “meatball” studded with chunks of mushroom and bell pepper. Photo by Moshe Zusman Photography Studio. - See more at: http://jewishfoodexperience.com/recipes/moroccan-style-stuffed-artichoke-bottoms/#sthash.piV4mXPY.dpuf
Stuffed artichoke bottoms (left in the photo above), prepared by the Moroccan side of my family, always made Shabbat and holiday meals (especially Passover) special while growing up. Coincidentally, Moshe Zusman, who photographed this dish, shared that his own Moroccan mother makes them and that this dish is one of his favorites as well. The artichoke bottoms are usually stuffed with meatballs. However, I inherited my nutritionist grandmother’s passion for making vegetarian/vegan variations of our treasured family dishes. The natural choice was an eggplant “meatball” studded with chunks of mushroom and bell pepper. Photo by Moshe Zusman Photography Studio. - See more at: http://jewishfoodexperience.com/recipes/moroccan-style-stuffed-artichoke-bottoms/#sthash.piV4mXPY.dpuf
Stuffed artichoke bottoms (left in the photo above), prepared by the Moroccan side of my family, always made Shabbat and holiday meals (especially Passover) special while growing up. Coincidentally, Moshe Zusman, who photographed this dish, shared that his own Moroccan mother makes them and that this dish is one of his favorites as well. The artichoke bottoms are usually stuffed with meatballs. However, I inherited my nutritionist grandmother’s passion for making vegetarian/vegan variations of our treasured family dishes. The natural choice was an eggplant “meatball” studded with chunks of mushroom and bell pepper. Photo by Moshe Zusman Photography Studio. - See more at: http://jewishfoodexperience.com/recipes/moroccan-style-stuffed-artichoke-bottoms/#sthash.piV4mXPY.dpuf

back to Recipe Collection

 

Carciofi alla Giudia (Jewish-Style Artichokes)

 

February 15, 2015

katzir-stuffed-artichoke2 Related:   gluten-free, Hanukkah, kid-friendly, pareve, Passover, Shabbat, vegan, vegetables & legumes, vegetarian
 
 2  0  4  0
 

Prep time: 40-45 mins

Cook time: 20-25 mins

Yield: 4 servings

User Rating:
 
 
Rating: 0.0/4 (0 votes cast)
 

It seems that any dish that has the word Jewish in its name is fried. “Jewish fish” is actually fried fish, which, when introduced to Britain by late seventeenth-century Sephardic refugees, evolved into fish and chips. A Jewish-style artichoke (right in the photo above), which is a family favorite, adopted from Sephardic Roman-Jewish cuisine via my Moroccan granny is a fried and seasoned artichoke that tastes like potato chips. In my family, we usually eat this during Hanukkah, when it is customary to eat fried foods, as well as during Passover.

- See more at: http://jewishfoodexperience.com/recipes/carciofi-alla-giudia-jewish-style-artichokes/#sthash.RATAZXSQ.dpuf

back to Recipe Collection

 

Carciofi alla Giudia (Jewish-Style Artichokes)

 

February 15, 2015

katzir-stuffed-artichoke2 Related:   gluten-free, Hanukkah, kid-friendly, pareve, Passover, Shabbat, vegan, vegetables & legumes, vegetarian
 
 2  0  4  0
 

Prep time: 40-45 mins

Cook time: 20-25 mins

Yield: 4 servings

User Rating:
 
 
Rating: 0.0/4 (0 votes cast)
 

It seems that any dish that has the word Jewish in its name is fried. “Jewish fish” is actually fried fish, which, when introduced to Britain by late seventeenth-century Sephardic refugees, evolved into fish and chips. A Jewish-style artichoke (right in the photo above), which is a family favorite, adopted from Sephardic Roman-Jewish cuisine via my Moroccan granny is a fried and seasoned artichoke that tastes like potato chips. In my family, we usually eat this during Hanukkah, when it is customary to eat fried foods, as well as during Passover.

- See more at: http://jewishfoodexperience.com/recipes/carciofi-alla-giudia-jewish-style-artichokes/#sthash.RATAZXSQ.dpuf

back to Recipe Collection

 

Carciofi alla Giudia (Jewish-Style Artichokes)

 

February 15, 2015

katzir-stuffed-artichoke2 Related:   gluten-free, Hanukkah, kid-friendly, pareve, Passover, Shabbat, vegan, vegetables & legumes, vegetarian
 
 2  0  4  0
 

Prep time: 40-45 mins

Cook time: 20-25 mins

Yield: 4 servings

User Rating:
 
 
Rating: 0.0/4 (0 votes cast)
 

It seems that any dish that has the word Jewish in its name is fried. “Jewish fish” is actually fried fish, which, when introduced to Britain by late seventeenth-century Sephardic refugees, evolved into fish and chips. A Jewish-style artichoke (right in the photo above), which is a family favorite, adopted from Sephardic Roman-Jewish cuisine via my Moroccan granny is a fried and seasoned artichoke that tastes like potato chips. In my family, we usually eat this during Hanukkah, when it is customary to eat fried foods, as well as during Passover.

- See more at: http://jewishfoodexperience.com/recipes/carciofi-alla-giudia-jewish-style-artichokes/#sthash.RATAZXSQ.dpuf

back to Recipe Collection

 

Carciofi alla Giudia (Jewish-Style Artichokes)

 

February 15, 2015

katzir-stuffed-artichoke2 Related:   gluten-free, Hanukkah, kid-friendly, pareve, Passover, Shabbat, vegan, vegetables & legumes, vegetarian
 
 2  0  4  0
 

Prep time: 40-45 mins

Cook time: 20-25 mins

Yield: 4 servings

User Rating:
 
 
Rating: 0.0/4 (0 votes cast)
 

It seems that any dish that has the word Jewish in its name is fried. “Jewish fish” is actually fried fish, which, when introduced to Britain by late seventeenth-century Sephardic refugees, evolved into fish and chips. A Jewish-style artichoke (right in the photo above), which is a family favorite, adopted from Sephardic Roman-Jewish cuisine via my Moroccan granny is a fried and seasoned artichoke that tastes like potato chips. In my family, we usually eat this during Hanukkah, when it is customary to eat fried foods, as well as during Passover.

- See more at: http://jewishfoodexperience.com/recipes/carciofi-alla-giudia-jewish-style-artichokes/#sthash.RATAZXSQ.dpuf
Print Print | Sitemap
® Sephardic Heritage INternational DC (Sephardic Heritage IN DC) (SHINDC)